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South Devon, 24 March 2017

A cold and grey day dawned, all six of us were not put off in the slightest.

Our first stop of the day was at Powderham Church where the first bird of the day award went to two Cattle Egrets. This winter, especially late winter/early spring has seen an influx of this species involving record numbers in the SW. Our egret du0 had a couple of Little Egret and a flock of sheep for company. Walking down t0 the railway bridge we used the height advantage to scan the Exe at low tide. Flocks and small parties of Dark-bellied Brent Goose, Shelduck, Dunlin, Curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit, Grey Plover, Redshank, Pintail, Wigeon, Teal, Red-breasted Merganser, Great Crested Grebe, Little Egret, Cormorants and various gull species were on show.

Next stop was nearby at Powderham park where c15 Sand Martin fed over the pools, Shelduck and other common wildfowl were also roosting or perhaps sheltering from the cold NE wind. We made a couple of stops at Cockwood/Starcross to scan the estuary. Highlights included 3 Greenshank, a drake Goosander, 2 Shag, 2 Slavonian Grebe and Turnstones among the wader flocks.

Moving on to Dawlish Warren we had a short lunch stop and then scanned the sea from the seawall. A party of 3 and 6 Common Scoter, 2 Great Crested Grebe, a few Shag, two flyby Fulmar, Guillemot and a Red-throated Diver were noted albeit distantly. The six scoter flew in closer which gave us a better view. Parties of Meadow Pipit and an alba wagtail flew in off the sea. Turnstones did a tightrope walk act along the groynes.

A short drive beyond Teignmouth and we were able to park and then scan the clifftop fields at Labrador Bay RSPB, we located a flock of 25+ Cirl Bunting as they fed close to the hedgerow. It was great to watch them and listen to the contact calls. A nervous flock of Linnets proved why when Sparrowhawk went through. A few Chiffchaff were also grubbing about in the fields and hedgerows for insects, no doubt newly arrived. From the lower path we enjoyed listening to singing Cirl Buntings and watching a pair of Kestrel below us. Attention was drawn to the sea, a party of six Long-tailed Duck, 111 Common Scoter also harboured two larger and darker 2cy Velvet Scoters. A few Gannets streamed by and  Peregrine had a look at us before it cruised along the cliffs.

Back up at the car park we saw a Sparrowhawk over sea before it headed inland. A group decision was to reject plans to look for the Humpback Whale that was resident in Start Bay the preceding month. It had got itself tangled in crab pot ropes a couple of days before and needed a rescue party to cut if free. It wasn’t seen the day before so we stuck with the birding.

Our last stop of the day was at Bowling Green Marsh RSPB which also had c30 Sand Martin as well as 4 Little Grebe, Teal, Wigeon, Mallard, Shoveler, Black-tailed Godwit flock, Redshanks, a Green Sandpiper, Sparrowhawk and calling Cetti’s Warbler. At the Clyst viewing platform we had a large flock of Redshank but it was clear many of the wader species had departed for the summer, especially the Avocets, we saw none!

To top the day off the group saw their first two Swallow of 2017 in sunshine as I was off collecting the car.

Thank you to all who joined me, it was a very good day out. Some images of the day follow.

Martin

Cirl Buntings at Labrador Bay RSPB

Cirl Bunting, Devon, MJMcGill 2 Cirl Bunting, Devon, MJMcGill, 4 Cirl Bunting, female, MJMcGILL Cirl Buntings, Devon, MJMcGill

Long-tailed Ducks in Labrador Bay

Long-tailed Duck, Labrador Bay, MJMcGill LTDUCKS 4 LTDUCKS, 3 LTDucks 2

LTDucks

Velvet Scoters (1s male and female, top two) with Common Scoter

Velvet and Common Scoter, Labrador Bay Velvet and Common Scoter

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Martin

at 5:20 pm

Forest of Dean, 4 March 2017

Another late winter ‘FoD’ visit saw nine of us meeting up (many thanks to Keith for giving Jeanne a lift). It was a fine chorus that greeted us, numerous Song Thrush, Robin and a variety of tits singing and calling. Coal Tits and Nuthatches were seen down to ‘our level’ thanks to some seed. A Mistle Thrush was busy collecting moss from the upper branches of an oak, something insulating to add to its nest.

Out on the field we had good views of the flocks of Redwings along with the common thrushes. With a little patience and quiet stalking a couple of Hawfinch were located, unfortunately these birds were very secretive and refused to show for us. Great spotted Woodpecker was also noted.

We relocated to take in a walk up to Crabtree Hill, our first birds were a pair of Crossbill atop the larches, we had reasonable scope views before these birds dropped in to feed out of view. Goldcrest were singing in the firs and many pairs or small parties of Siskin were mobile as they flew over or stuck to the canopy. A trio of Redpoll stopped for a short time in the top of the trees but flew away before we could ‘scope’ them. The finches were not going to make it easy for us!

At the trig point we scanned the heath, our target bird was present as we watched the wintering Great Grey Shrike from a safe distance, this is a popular bird, I must thank everyone for accepting scope views only, we had left it the whole heath to hunt in peace. A Reed Buntings was also skulking in the gorse and grass before flying off over us. A distant Goshawk soared over the valley along with a Buzzard. Four Lapwing flew down the valley in the distance.

We wandered back to take in a refreshment and comfort stop in Parkend. A take out coffee and cake was followed by a walk through the woods and a search of the stream. The brook was in spate after heavy rain the day before, we couldn’t locate any Dippers but a Treecreeper gave us good views. Back at the car a flock of 6 Hawfinch flew over us and landed  in the canopy, one or two showed through the branches until they all flew back over us and away.

Moving on to New Fancy View a female Goshawk flew across the road just after leaving the village but only for the driver (me), at the viewpoint it was rather busy with people so we went for another woodland walk with a few common species noted (a party of Raven the pick of the bunch) before we dropped in at the Cannop Valley. Grey Wagtails were about the ponds and a Cormorant came in.

Out in a nearby clearing we picked up a Sparrowhawk and another Crossbill flew up the valley. Back to the car for a short drive to the upper pond where we located Mandarins on the flood puddles in the woods and a Marsh Tit was added to the list. The weather was closing in with a heavy shower so we all decided to head home and take in Walmore Common on the way.

The ditches held a few Wigeon and Teal with Grey Heron and a pair of Mute Swans but the wintering Whooper Swans had probably moved on. We had run over on time getting back to Whitminster by 3pm, this concluded the extended half day out.

Thank you to all who joined me

Martin

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at 9:03 pm